My Photographs: Top 5 The Alhambra – Granada, Spain.

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View From The Muslim Quarter, March 2017. I’ve lost count of the number of palaces, castles, forts and royal residences seen during my travels. The Taj Mahal was pretty damn special, Casablanca’s Hassan Mosque not too shabby. The ghostly ruin of Slovakia’s Spissky Hrad was an underrated delight and Bangkok’s Grand Palace a monstrous love-hate experience like no other. In Spain of course it’s all about The Alhambra, a fourteenth century palace-fortress watching over the Andalusian city of Granada. A unique blend of Christian and Moorish architecture, with UNESCO World Heritage kudos to boot, today the Alhambra is Spain’s most visited monument. This shot was taken from Paseo de los Tristes in the city’s Muslim Quarter.

The Palace of Charles V, March 2017. The Alhambra complex is huge and many of its sights free to enter. You can stroll through the public gardens and dip into the sixteenth century Santa Maria Church. But the pick of the bunch was this unfinished renaissance palace commissioned by the holy Roman Emperor Charles V. It was supposed to symbolise the triumph of Christianity over Islam, but after years of construction funds eventually dried up and it was never finished. Epic fail. 

Nazrid Palaces, March 2017. You’ll need a ticket to enter The Nazrid Palaces. This really can’t be stressed enough as on the weekends it can be booked up for months ahead. The crowds were huge on the afternoon of my visit and in truth the experience was a little obnoxious as I made my way through the initial courtyards and patios. The first real Wow! moment came here at Patio de los Arrayanes (Court of the Myrtles). It was named after the myrtle bushes growing on either side of the pond. Waiting patiently for the sea of elbows, heads, selfie sticks and baseball caps to clear, I finally secured this unobscured shot with a victorious click.

Nazrid Palaces, March 2017. The architectural details throughout are really impressive, from walls of glazed clay tiles and multi colored mosaics, to barrel-vaulted wood carved ceilings and flowery Arabic inscriptions.

Palace Gardens, March 2017. Entering the palace gardens felt a bit like coming up for air after being underwater. Here you can survey the delicious openness, figure out where everyone’s heading and shoot off in the opposite direction. The gardens are gorgeous and meticulously kept, with deep blue reflecting ponds, bright red persimmon trees and cobbled walkways with fine views across the city and the surrounding countryside. To see my top five photos from the city of Granada itself, click here

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