My Photographs: Top 5 Córdoba, Spain.

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Kairouan, March 2017. I really have been spoilt here recently in the south of Spain. Camino Del Rey is one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever seen; Ronda has that amazing gorge and Granada boasts The Alhambra. Although ever so slightly in the shadow of its neighbors, Córdoba’s main draw is The Mezquita, the world’s third largest mosque. Rather than suffer a tedious two hour forty-five minute bus journey, I opted for the pricier sixty-minute bullet train from Malaga. Having focused all my pre-trip research on The Mezquita, on arrival I was blown away with how gorgeous the city itself is! This charming street sums up the vibe nicely, a cobbled stretch that runs alongside the walls of the historical centre. Illuminated by the afternoon sun, you can also see The Puerta de Almodovar Gate, the entrance point to the old town.

Plaza De Las Tendillas, March 2017. Like most Andalucian cities, Córdoba offers square after stunning café-lined square. This is the city’s main plaza and also its biggest, dominated by a massive fountain and statue of Gran Capitán by the sculptor Mateo Inurria. The great captain’s real name was Gonzalo Fernández de Córdoba and he was a Spanish army general who fought in the Conquest of Granada and the Italian Wars.

Puente Romano, March 2017. The highlight of my explorations was definitely the area in and around the Roman Bridge. I made my approach through the dramatic Renaissance gateway door (Puerta del Puente), under which a beautiful local girl wowed onlookers with a stirring rendition of The Beatles’ Yesterday on the cello. And then it was up onto the bridge itself for views across the River Guadalquivir. A nearby riverside nature trail is great for leaving the crowds behind and catching sight of an old Islamic water wheel once used for raising water for the nearby city gardens.

View From Calahorra Tower, March 2017. Once you’ve crossed the bridge, be sure to dip into the Museum of Andaluican Life. The exhibits of the region’s history are mildly interesting, but the four Euro fee is more than worth it thanks to the panoramic from the top floor.

El Porton Cafe, March 2017. The abundance of cafes in Cordoba leaves visitors truly spoilt for choice. A particularly fine collection can be found around the gate to the historical centre. This shot was taken at El Porton Café, where the tables and chairs extend far out into the grass and trees by the roadside. Waiters dip in between tables, people clink glasses of tinto and dogs pant at the feet of their tapas-nibbling owners. All the while this violin-playing local provides the musical ambience with a wry smile.

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