My Photographs: Top 5 Greenwich, London.

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Greenwich Market, April 2017. “Let’s meet up in Greenwich!” she said, “I love Greenwich!” And so it was decided. I hadn’t been to Greenwich since I was a kid, with only a vague memory of my dad taking me onboard The Cutty Sark. Back in the present, it was an absolutely gorgeous day and the people were out in full force, strolling along The River Thames, lunching outside Trafalgar Tavern and lying on the grass in front of The Royal Naval College. Greenwich Market was pumping too, with its world food stalls, cupcake stands and organic coffee huts. Meanwhile, in the market’s bustling Admiral Hardy Pub, rosy-cheeked beer-swilling men cheered on their chosen horses as The Grand National got underway on a series of giant screens.

Greenwich Park, April 2017. As delightful as the market was, the weather was so gorgeous I felt the need to push on to Greenwich Park for the climb up to The Royal Observatory. This shot was taken from the top of the hill as I looked back down on the way I’d come. The white building in the centre of the photo is Queen’s House, a seventeenth century former royal residence and home to Anne Denmark, the queen of King James I. On the far left stands the National Maritime Museum.

Royal Observatory, April 2017. This regal old building sits in a picture perfect location atop Greenwich Park, with fine view over The Thames and across the London skyline. Built in 1676 on the order of Charles II, it has played a key role in the history of astronomy and navigation and is the location of the prime meridian. Today you can check out the UK’s largest refracting telescope (28 inches!) in the onion dome, while in the southern end the astronomy galleries boast a four and a half billion-year-old meteorite! Don’t miss the unusual twenty-four hour analogue-dial Shepherd Clock outside the main gate; the first clock ever to show Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) directly to the public. 

The Cutty Sark, April 2017. What an amazing and unique sight this legendary old boat is! A world famous nineteenth century clipper that used to transport tea to China; The Cutty Sark was one of the fastest boats in British naval history and today is the only surviving tea clipper in the world. Clambering onboard to discover its rich and colourful history is enormous fun! You can poke your nose into the crews’ quarters, take the helm at the ship’s wheel and go head to head with Nannie, the ship’s famous figurehead.

The River Thames, April 2017. On my way back to Cutty Sark (for Maritime Greenwich) DLR station, I decided to walk along The Thames to catch the sunset. I honestly can’t remember the last time I experienced such idyllic weather in London. I’d had such a perfect day I half wondered for a moment if I should pack in this nomadic lifestyle of mine and return home for a settled life on the mother ship. It was a warm, fuzzy highly romanticised daydream that lasted perhaps a minute or two. But then I shook myself, remembered the million and one reasons I could never live in London and bade goodbye to Greenwich for the second time in my life. It’s cool though, because I know we’ll meet again.

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