My 5: Eduardo Marques Square, Macau.

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1. Eduardo Marques Square, February 2018. This rectangular cobblestone square in Macau’s Coloane Island sits just a short walk from the village main street off Avenida Cinco de Outbro. Positioned gorgeously opposite the seaside promenade, the square is home to a number of cafes and restaurants where you can have lunch opposite the handsome backdrop of St. Francis Xavier Chapel.

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My 5: St. Lawrence’s Church, Macau.

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1. St. Lawrence’s Church, February 2018. I don’t think Wonderboy and I managed to see ALL the churches in Macau, but we must have gotten close. This one, towering above Rua de São Lourenço, is one of the peninsula’s oldest structures dating back to the mid sixteenth century.

2. St. Lawrence’s Church, February 2018. It’s an impressive neo-classical structure peppered with touches of baroque details. This is the main room, Hall of the Soothing Winds, where the families of Portuguese sailors used to gather to pray for the safe return of their loved ones out at sea.

3. St. Lawrence’s Church, February 2018. St. Lawrence is the patron saint of navigation, a sea god in the eyes of the Portuguese who protects people. Images of the old dude decorate the altar, a bible clutched in his left hand, a staff in his right.

4. St. Lawrence’s Church, February 2018. For me, the thing that really sets St. Lawrence’s apart from the other churches we saw was its gorgeous garden bursting with palm trees, rose bushes and all manner of exotic plants.

5. St. Lawrence’s Church, February 2018. Check out the beautiful glass panels showing engraved scenes from the bible. The church and garden is free to enter and open from 10:00-18:00 (Monday to Friday) & 10:00-13:00 (Saturdays). It’s closed on Sundays.

For more on my time in this amazing corner of China, check out my other articles on Macau.

Like these? Then why not leaf through my many other 5s from across China.

I’ve also written a short story series called Challenged in China.

 

My 5: Mandarin’s House, Macau.

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1. Mandarin’s House, February 2018. There are two nineteenth century historical townhouses in Macau peninsula that are open to the public. This one, located on the quiet Travessa de António da Silva, is the most famous as it was once home to the renowned Chinese reformist Zheng Guanyin. It’s free to enter, just give your nationality at the information counter and head on through the moon entrance arch.

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My 5: St. Dominic’s Church, Macau.

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1. St. Dominic’s Church, February 2018. Located right in the heart of Macau’s bustling Senado Square, this 16th century baroque church is one of the peninsula’s biggest hitters, with a steady flow of visitors swarming in and out throughout the day.

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My 5: Macau Protestant Chapel & Cemetery.

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1. Macau Protestant Chapel & Cemetery, February 2018. Macau Peninsula is blessed with an abundance of gorgeous old churches. This Anglican chapel, discreetly located at the side of Camoes Garden, is a hidden gem that could easily be missed by the uninformed wanderer. It was built in 1922 to serve the employees of the East India Company.

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My 5: Camoes Garden, Macau.

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1. Camoes Garden, February 2018. Macau Peninsula’s oldest and largest park can be found in the Santo António neighborhood and is accessed via Luis de Camoes square. Before entering the park, grab a bench and observe the local seniors who come here to play chess, sleep, chat and engage in the time honored Chinese tradition of sittin’ doin’ nothin’.

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My 5: Monte Fort, Macau.

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1. Monte Fort, February 2018. Macau’s 400-year-old stone fort sits snugly next to The Ruins of St. Paul in the peninsula’s gorgeous historical centre. Built by the Jesuits in the 1620s, the top battlements feature a number of cannons and enclosed quarters for soldiers and storage rooms. The fort was maintained as a military base right up until 1965.

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